You Should Avoid These 8 Exercises During Pregnancy

You Should Avoid These 8 Exercises During Pregnancy

Moderation is the key. Exercise during pregnancy can be beneficial for pregnant women. However, you have to know several types of them are not well-suited for a pregnant woman. 

The first thing you have to think of before even starting is to get a green light from your doctor. There are a few criteria and physical assessment that need to be done before allowing you to commit to a certain exercise regime.

If everything looks okay, you should be fine as long as you comply with their advice. 

How much exercise during pregnancy is considered enough?

exercises during pregnancy

Exercise during pregnancy, though offers a lot of potential benefits can be downright harmful if you were over committing it.

The key is to recognise your limitation and strength as you were carrying another person for the next few months or so.

However, don’t let this stop you from doing exercise at all.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG) recommends 20-30 minutes physical activities of moderate intensity every day up until the day of delivery. 

It sounds daunting. However, you should know that even the simplest movement, count. This includes brisk walking, doing house chores or doing a simple guided workout.

If you aren’t really able to spend much time on the elliptical machine, spread out your workouts into five mini one throughout the day. It does sound laborious but it’s actually not.

You should avoid this exercise during pregnancy

exercises during pregnancy

When we talk about things you shouldn’t do during pregnancy, some of the exercise regimes do fit in that particular category.

Here are some exercises that you should avoid when you while you are being pregnant:

  • Highly competitive sports that would impose risks of abdominal injury or fall. This includes football, outdoor cycling, ice-skating, football, basketball, rollerblading and bungee jumping
  • Any sports that require you to ascend more than 6000 feet high
  • Diving which can cause decompression sickness to your baby
  • Sits up or double leg lifts. Seriously, anything that would require you to do some advanced abdominal moves. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t put some work on your abs. Static, endurance-based exercises such as planking are considered the best abdominal exercise during pregnancy.
  • Do not attempt any exercise that requires you to lie flat on your back, especially after you are 4 months pregnant. The enlarged uterus can compress on the major blood vessels that carry blood to the heart which can cause a few symptoms. Those include dizziness, nausea and shortness of breath.
  • Do not exercise when the weather is hot. Your blood vessels, including the one in the uterus, would shunt away to the skin in an effort to cool it down. A big no to any facilities that offer hot-related activities such as sauna rooms, hot tubs or steam rooms.
  • Yoga which practices motionless standing. This can restrict blood flow to the fetus and mother which can cause harm rather than goods.
  • Any exercise that involves jumping, bouncing or sudden movement can increase fall risk. Avoid those too.

Exercise during pregnancy, you shouldn’t overdid it

exercises during pregnancy

Don’t overdo it. While exercising, you should recognize how your body feels to a certain kind of exercise. If you can’t do it, don’t force yourself. 

You should set a realistic aim as not to overexert your body that can lead to complications such as dehydration and breathlessness. 

While it’s a good idea for you to stay fit, this is not a suitable time for you to increase your training intensity or duration.

You should avoid any exercise that causes you to struggle with breathing, up to the point that you can’t talk. Well, for now. If you experience any of the symptoms below, stop exercising immediately.

  • Irritable.
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle aches
  • Fatigue

If you experience distressing symptoms after stopping exercise regimen, go and see your doctor.

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    Xavier_Ramirez

    The intensity, duration and frequency of exercise should start at a level that does not result in pain, shortness of breath or excessive fatigue. Exercise may then progress at a rate that avoids significant discomfort. Patients should be counseled to perform frequent self-assessments of physical conditioning and well-being, including hydration, caloric intake, quality of rest and presence of muscle or joint pain. It should be stressed that decreases in exercise performance are common, especially later in pregnancy. The goal is to allow the pregnant patient to obtain the maximal benefits of general well-being derived from exercise, while ensuring that no detrimental effects occur in the mother or the fetus.

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